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Hysteromyoma
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A uterine myoma is a benign growth of smooth muscle in the wall of the uterus.

A uterine myoma (myoma uteri) is a solid tumor made of fibrous tissue; hence it is often called a 'fibroid' tumor. Myomas vary in size and number, and are most often slow-growing and usually cause no symptoms. Myomas that do not produce symptoms do not need to be treated. Approximately 25% of myomas will cause symptoms and need medical treatment.
 

Myomas may grow as a single nodule or in clusters and may range in size from 1 mm to more than 20 cm in diameter. Myomas are the most frequently diagnosed tumor of the female pelvis and the most common reason for a woman to have a hysterectomy. Although they are often referred to as tumors, they are not cancerous.
 

Causes
 

Uterine fibroids are common. As many as 1 in 5 women may have fibroids during their childbearing years. Half of all women have fibroids by age 50.Fibroids are rare in women under age 20. They are more common in African-Americans than Caucasians.No one knows exactly what causes fibroids. They are thought to be caused by:
 

· Hormones in the body
 

· Genes (may run in families)
 

Fibroids can be so tiny that you need a microscope to see them. They can also grow very large. They may fill the entire uterus and may weigh several pounds. Although it is possible for just one fibroid to develop, usually there is more than one.
 

Fibroids can grow:
 

· In the muscle wall of the uterus (myometrial)
 

· Just under the surface of the uterine lining (submucosal)
 

· Just under the outside lining of the uterus (subserosal)
 

· On a long stalk on the outside the uterus or inside the uterus (pedunculated)
 

Symptoms
 

Common symptoms of uterine fibroids are:
 

· Bleeding between periods
 

· Heavy bleeding during your period, sometimes with blood clots
 

· Periods that may last longer than normal
 

· Needing to urinate more often
 

· Pelvic cramping or pain with periods
 

· Feeling fullness or pressure in your lower belly
 

· Pain during intercourse
 

Often, you can have fibroids and not have any symptoms. Your health care provider may find them during a physical exam or other test. Fibroids often shrink and cause no symptoms in women who have gone through menopause. A recent study also showed that some small fibroids shrink in premenopausal women.
 

Exams and Tests
 

Your health care provider will perform a pelvic exam. This may show that you have a change in the shape of your womb.
 

Fibroids aren't always easy to diagnose. Being obese may make fibroids harder to detect. Your doctor may do these tests to look for fibroids:
 

Ultrasound uses sound waves to create a picture of the uterus
 

Hysteroscopy uses a long, thin tube inserted into through the vagina and into the uterus to examine the inside of the uterus
 

If you have unusual bleeding, your doctor may do one of these procedures:
 

A small piece of the lining of the uterus is removed and checked for cancer(endometrial biopsy)
 

The doctor inserts a small tube through a small cut in your belly to look inside your pelvis (laparoscopy)

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